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Photos for November 2015

(Click on photos to enlarge)IMG_5247

Thousands of people march from Ottawa City Hall to Parliament Hill Nov. 29th as part of the global campaign for action on climate change. The 100% Possible climate march was one of about 1,700 marches worldwide urged governments to move toward 100 per cent renewable energy by 2050.

durocher2The Archbishop of Gatineau, Que., Paul-André Durocher, represented faith communities at the climate change rally Nov. 29 that drew thousands of people. Durocher, former president of the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops, noted Pope Francis’ calls for nations to take action on climate change and also took part in the 100% Possible climate march to Parliament Hill. The march was one of about 1,700 marches worldwide urged governments to move toward 100 per cent renewable energy by 2050.

durocher                                                                                                                                                                      As above

suzukiEnvironmental activist David Suzuki was loudly cheered by the thousands of people who turned out for the 100% Possible march in Ottawa Nov. 29, the eve of the Paris climate summit. This is “an opportunity for radical transformation in our society, he told the crowd. “We have to transform the way we live on this planet.” But Suzuki also cautioned the crowd to be thoughtful or else “the right wing ideologues and bigots will seize the moment to take over the agenda.”

IMG_5218                                                                                                                                                                      As above

Annie Smith St-GeorgesRespected Aboriginal Elder Annie Smith-St. Georges was among a handful of aboriginal speakers who spoke at the 100% Possible climate rally in Ottawa Nov. 29 in support of the global campaign for action by governments on climate change.

IMG_5164Thousands of people gathered at Ottawa City Hall Nov. 29 before marching to Parliament Hill as part of the global campaign for action on climate change. The 100% Possible climate march was one of about 1,700 marches worldwide urged governments to move toward 100 per cent renewable energy by 2050.

IMG_5695Carleton University has awarded an honorary doctorate to Justice Murray Sinclair, who headed the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada. The degree, presented at the university’s fall convocation ceremony Nov. 14, was presented to Sinclair “in recognition of his stellar career in judiciary as well as his dedication, care and service to Aboriginal and First Nations peoples and to all Canadians in leading the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.” Sinclair was appointed as chair of the Commission in 2009 to look into the history and legacy of Indian residential schools. He has received a National Aboriginal Achievement Award in addition to many other community service awards and nine honorary degrees.

 

trudeaus-wreath2Newly elected Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his wife, Sophie Grégoire-Trudeau, place a wreath at the National War Memorial in Ottawa on behalf of the Canadian government as a children’s choir sang “In Flanders Fields.” Tens of thousands of people turned out for the Remembrance Day ceremony Nov. 11, that was marked by two minutes of silence at 11:00 a.m., the playing of The Last Post, a 21-gun salute and a fly-over by Canadian forces jets.

 

trudeaus-wreathAs above

gg-wreathGovernor-General David Johnston and his wife, Sharon Johnston, place a wreath at the National War Memorial in Ottawa on behalf of the people of Canada.

andersonNational Silver Cross Mother, Sheila Anderson, of the Northwest Territories, places a wreath at the National War Memorial in Ottawa Nov. 11 on behalf of all Canadian mothers who lost children in the country’s wars.
Her son, Cpl. Jordan Anderson, 25, and five other Canadian soldiers were killed by a roadside bomb in Afghanistan in 2007. He is buried at the National Military Cemetery at Beechwood Cemetery in Ottawa.
Brig-Gen Guy ChapdelaineBrigadier-General Guy Chapdelaine, the Chaplain General of the Canadian Armed Forces, led in prayers for God’s blessing and guidance at the Remembrance Day Ceremony at the National War Memorial in Ottawa Nov. 11. He also invited people to use the moment for personal reflection if they so choose. The appointment of Chapdelaine, a Roman Catholic priest of the Archdiocese of Sherbrooke, was announced on February 11, 2015. He has served as military chaplain in Kosovo and in Afghanistan.

gg-andersonGovernor-General David Johnston explains details of the March Past to Silver Cross Mother Sheila Anderson at the Saluting base following the Remembrance Day ceremony at the National War Memorial in Ottawa Nov. 11.

trudeaus-waveNewly elected Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his wife, Sophie Grégoire-Trudeau, wave at spectators following the Remembrance Day Ceremony at the National War Memorial in Ottawa Nov. 11.

trudeau-andersonPrime Minister Justin Trudeau shares a moment with Silver Cross Mother Sheila Anderson while awaiting the march past of veterans following the following the Remembrance Day Ceremony at the National War Memorial in Ottawa Nov. 11.

trudeaus-ChapdelaineBrigadier-General Guy Chapdelaine, the Chaplain General of the Canadian Armed Forces, chats with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his wife, Sophie Grégoire-Trudeau, following the Remembrance Day Ceremony.

newvet A “New Generation Veteran” places his poppy on the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at the National War Memorial in Ottawa on Remembrance Day.

trudeau3 Justin Trudeau, sworn as Canada’s prime minister Nov. 4, will have his hands full when his Liberal government begins work on issues affecting First Nations communities. But he’ll have the help of 10 Aboriginal MPs elected in the Oct. 19 federal election. Trudeau, seen here embracing Elder Evelyn Commanda Dewache, a residential school survivor, during the closing ceremony of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) in Ottawa June 3, has promised a “renewed nation-to-nation relationship with Indigenous Peoples that respects rights and honours treaties.” He supports all the recommendations of the TRC, has pledged to call an inquiry into missing and murdered indigenous women, and vows to spend $2.6 billion on reserve education over four years.

hiltz

Archbishop Fred Hiltz, Primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, and Bishop Susan Johnson, National Bishop of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada, congratulated Justin Trudeau following his swearing in as Canada’s new prime minister. In a joint letter Nov. 4, the pair said Trudeau has “set a bold vision for our country.” They also welcomed Trudeau’s “commitment to work closely with all levels of government on issues such as homelessness, lifting children and seniors out of poverty, improving our welcome of refugees, and refocusing development assistance to the poorest and most vulnerable.” As well, they supported his commitment to implementing the recommendations of the Truth & Reconciliation Commission. “We share the goal to build and strengthen relationships across Canada – with Indigenous and non-Indigenous Canadians – grounded in right relationships, compassion and justice.”

bennettToronto MP Carolyn Bennett, a former family physician and assistant professor, was named as the new Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs in Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s first cabinet. Bennett, who was the Opposition critic for Aboriginal affairs, will need to move quickly to get Trudeau’s promised inquiry into missing and murdered indigenous underway.

mccallumAs the new Liberal government’s Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship, veteran MP John McCallum has the difficult task of implementing Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s election promise to bring 25,000 Syrian refugees to Canada by the end of 2015. McCallum held several cabinet positions in the former Liberal government of Jean Chretien including Minister of National Defence. He was also the Liberal Critic for Citizenship and Immigration, Multiculturalism, and Seniors.
mckennaOttawa Centre MP Catherine McKenna becomes Minister of Environment and Climate Change in the Liberal government of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. McKenna, a former legal advisor and negotiator for the United Nations peacekeeping mission in East Timor, is the only Ottawa-area member of cabinet.

harperStephen Harper met with Governor General David Johnston to formally resign as prime minister of Canada shortly before the swearing-in ceremony of the new prime minister, Justin Trudeau. Harper had already signalled his intention to resign as prime minister, when he met the Governor General on Oct. 20, one day after the general election.

supreme court2Religious leaders from several faith communities urge Canadian lawmakers to “enact and uphold laws that enhance human solidarity by promoting the rights to life and security for all people.” At a joint news conference on Parliament Hill Oct. 29, the leaders, representing over 30 Christian denominations, and Jewish and Muslims leaders from across Canada released a declaration on physician-assisted suicide that also called for accessible good-quality home care and palliative care. As well, the declaration wants regulations and policies that “ensure respect for the freedom of conscience of all health-care workers and administrators who will not and cannot accept suicide or euthanasia as a medical solution to pain and suffering.” Prime minister Justin Trudeau is expected to ask the Supreme Court of Canada for a six-month extension to craft new laws around physician-assisted dying.

portmanWell-known former broadcaster, newspaper columnist and Anglican priest, the Ven. William “Bill” Portman, died in Regina Oct. 26 at the age of 85. Portman hosted radio shows on spiritual themes on CBC radio and on CKCK Radio in Regina beginning in the 1960s. He was also a book review editor for the Anglican Journal for 14 years ending in 2004.Portman was also honorary assistant at All Saints Anglican Church in Regina, where his funeral was held Oct. 31.